Older person

Information about your rights as an older person, including payments, rebates, care and the right to live in a safe and respectful environment.

As an older person, you can get government payments and rebates to help with the cost of living.

You can access home support services and aged care options depending on your care needs.

It’s a good idea to plan ahead and speak to a lawyer about preparing your will, enduring power of attorney or enduring guardianship.

You have a right to live in a safe and respectful environment and to get help if you need it.

You can claim the Age Pension once you reach the pension age.

From 1 July 2023, the Age Pension is 67 years if your birthdate is on or after 1 January 1957. Previously, it was 66 years and 6 months.

For more information, see Age Pension on the Services Australia website. 

You can apply for a Commonwealth Seniors Health Card to get cheaper medicine under the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme and other benefits, if you meet the eligibility requirements.

For more information, see Commonwealth Seniors Health Card on the Services Australia website. 

You can access home support services through the Commonwealth Home Support Programme or Home Care Package depending on your care needs.

You can apply for an assessment online or by calling My Aged Care on 1800 200 422.

For more information, see How to apply for an assessment on the My Aged Care website. 

If you can no longer live at home and require ongoing help with everyday tasks, you may want to live in an aged home care (also known as a nursing home or residential aged care facility).

Aged care homes are either government funded or private. There are fees for this type of care.

For more information, see Aged care homes on the My Aged Care website.

If you have concerns about the care you or someone else is receiving in the aged care home, you can make a complaint to the Aged Care Quality Complaints and Safety Commission.

For more information, see Making a complaint on the Aged Care Quality and Safety Commission website. 

Planning ahead involves making arrangements for the future in case you lose your ability to make decisions.

You can:

  • ask a private lawyer to prepare your will to decide who gets your assets after you die
  • appoint an Enduring Power of Attorney to make financial decisions on your behalf if you lose capacity
  • appoint an Enduring Guardian to make lifestyle decisions on your behalf if you lose capacity.
  • prepare an Advance Care Directive to let people know what health care treatment you want have or refuse if you lose capacity.

For more information, see Planning for end of life on the NSW Government website.

You can use the End of Life Planner on the Service NSW website to help you prepare for end of life tasks and documents.

You have a right to live in a respectful and safe environment.

Elder abuse can take many different forms. It can be:

  • psychological or emotional abuse
  • neglect
  • financial abuse
  • physical abuse
  • sexual abuse
  • social abuse.

If you have concerns about your safety, or someone else you know, get urgent help.

You can call the Elder Abuse Helpline on 1800 353 374 for free information and support services for people who experience or witness the abuse of an older person.